Religion and Spirituality – Warriors For Christ Online http://warriorsforchristonline.org/ Fri, 18 Jun 2021 22:26:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/warriorsforchristonline-icon-150x150.png Religion and Spirituality – Warriors For Christ Online http://warriorsforchristonline.org/ 32 32 “The Paradigm of Connections” Connects Ancient Jewish Wisdom and Sanity https://warriorsforchristonline.org/the-paradigm-of-connections-connects-ancient-jewish-wisdom-and-sanity/ Fri, 18 Jun 2021 20:40:20 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/the-paradigm-of-connections-connects-ancient-jewish-wisdom-and-sanity/

The most recent approach to modern mental health is perhaps only 3,000 years old – and is Jewish.

In his new book, “The Connections Paradigm”, psychiatrist David H. Rosmarin explores an ancient concept in Jewish wisdom by claiming that humans are either connected or disconnected through three relationships in their lives – within (or with them). (themselves), the interpersonal and the spiritual – and that these relationships affect mental health.

Rosmarin, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Spirituality and Mental Health program at McLean Hospital, first heard of Rabbi Leib Kelemen’s “paradigm of connections”, which he said. calls his “religious mentor”. On a 2008 trip to visit Keleman in Jerusalem, Rosmarin told the rabbi he believed the world needed a spiritual approach to mental health, something that explained society’s struggles and offered solutions. practice.

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“There is a Jewish approach to this,” Rosmarin recalls, having told him the rabbi.

The psychiatrist spent the following years learning about Kelemen’s paradigm.

“If people have these three relationships and are in good shape, people can thrive and flourish,” said Rosmarin, “and not just be protected from anxiety, depression and depression. drug addiction – and all kinds of other illnesses that people come to hospitals for – but more broadly to live connected, happy, and flourishing lives. ”

Rosmarin attended Community Hebrew Academy in Toronto and spent time in a yeshiva before attending York University and University of Toronto and earning his doctorate. from Bowling Green State University. He compared Kelemen’s learning to “a fly on a yeshiva wall that took this concept and used it in clinical practice.”

Applying the connections paradigm to mental health, he said, was the real innovation.

“I don’t think there are a lot of people doing it,” he added. “I think it’s unique.”

Rosmarin, whose article “Psychiatry Needs to Get Right with God” was published on June 15 in Scientific American, said the mental health community has been receptive to the role of spirituality and religion in recent years.

He sees the Torah as a repository of strategies and ways to connect with God and improve emotional health. He said that “The Connections Paradigm” is a collection of such strategies.

“People’s relationship with God, whether close and connected or strained and absent, can have a big effect on how they feel,” Rosmarin said.

However, the information in the book is not just religious. The first section deals exclusively with a person’s relationship to himself.

The connection one has with one’s body – including diet, exercise, relationships with friends, and even the amount of nighttime sleep – plays a vital role in mental health, according to Rosmarin.

Taking care of your body is “not generally respected,” he said. “There are ground rules for the body, and we ignore them. Since Thomas Edison, nobody gets enough sleep. At the end of the day, we are no good. We are by no means role models of personal care. ”

He lamented the fact that people often don’t take the time to ask themselves why they ignore their relationship with their inner selves.

“Who is your North Star?” Rosmarin asked. “Where are we going? What is your goal? What are your values? If people respect their bodies and have a set of values, that is part of being a healthy human being.

The Book of Rosmarin is divided into three sections, each with four chapters containing a technique for connecting with ourselves, others, and our spirituality. He suspects that everyone will find at least one technique useful, even if they are already trying to lead a healthy lifestyle.

In fact, Rosmarin said that despite the book’s Jewish foundations, “The Connections Paradigm” was not written exclusively for a Jewish audience. Because of the universality of his tenets, he said, he may one day lecture at Columbia University and speak in a synagogue the next.

“It’s the culmination of 10 or 15 years of working on studying the paradigm, doing clinical work, helping my patients use the techniques and finally writing the book,” he said. “I am happy that he is available and available for people to learn more.” PJC

David Rullo can be contacted at drullo@pittsburghjewishchronicle.org.


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Ann Arbor Independent Bookstores https://warriorsforchristonline.org/ann-arbor-independent-bookstores/ Thu, 17 Jun 2021 18:31:05 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/ann-arbor-independent-bookstores/

Ann Arbor is home to an incredible number of independent bookstores. From comics to antiques, this city has it all.

Literary bookstore

Website: https://www.literatibookstore.com/

Instagram: @literatibookstore

Since opening in 2013, Literati has grown into an extremely popular bookstore with students and members of the community. It offers a wide selection of well-known and recently published fiction and poetry books on its main floor; in the basement, visitors will find collections on history, science, religion, sociology, social justice and more, while the second floor houses bargain books and a children’s section. Located just a few blocks from campus, Literati is a favorite haunt for many students for recently published novels and occasional readings, as well as books required for some humanities and social studies courses. Literati also hosts a series of author speakers and a book club, which currently remain virtual even though their storefront has reopened for browsing.


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The Gita lessons for overcoming hard times – The New Indian Express https://warriorsforchristonline.org/the-gita-lessons-for-overcoming-hard-times-the-new-indian-express/ Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:15:00 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/the-gita-lessons-for-overcoming-hard-times-the-new-indian-express/

ISKCON India Youth Council, in collaboration with Bada Business, will host a free webinar on “Workplace Prosperity and Peace of Mind Through Bhagavad Gita in Times of COVID Crisis” for ages 15-35 on June 20.

CEO and Founder of Bada Business, Vivek Bindra, said, “The webinar aims to bring the scientific wisdom of Bhagavad Gita to young people around the world. Wisdom cannot only be harnessed to lead a well-defined life path in an individual. and societal, but can also guide aspiring entrepreneurs, solopreneurs and wantepreneurs in building and running more resilient, productive and profitable businesses amid current economic instabilities. leadership qualities and live life ethically and happily. “

ISKCON wanted to celebrate the 125th birthday of Srila Prabhupada, Founder Acharya of ISKCON, and while brainstorming on a national event, this idea for this webinar was capitalized on. It will take place one day before International Yoga Day.

“Just as yoga helps us connect with the inner self, Business Yoga will help people understand how various aspects of the Bhagavad Gita can be articulated in real life situations, based on learnings extrapolated from shlokas, ”Bindra adds.

During the two hour session starting at 12:00, he will discuss: how to focus on his goal, how to choose the right direction, how to face life’s adversities, how to respect and treat each soul, how to stay balanced in good or bad situations, how to deal with competitors, what is the ultimate goal and what is the highest level of knowledge.

“Our webinar is not intended to promote any religion or any form of spirituality. We only wish to raise awareness of the practicality and the proven scientific wisdom of the Bhagavad Gita in a simple and understandable way. We are confident that our initiative will resonate because young people today appreciate logic-based learning, ”adds Bindra.

The lessons will be accompanied by examples and stories from the Bhagavad Gita, related to everyday life. “The youth of any country have always been a storehouse of possibilities, waiting to be channeled to the right path. They have the zeal and passion to succeed and also have the potential to contribute to society. Main of this webinar is to develop these capabilities, ”says Bindra.

ISKCON also aims to break the world record for most webinar attendees. Sundar Gopal Das, President of the IIYC, said: “More than five lakhs have registered so far. You can register on iiyc. corner. We campaign on social media platforms and also approach colleges and universities. “


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A critique of the Apostles of Change https://warriorsforchristonline.org/a-critique-of-the-apostles-of-change/ Wed, 16 Jun 2021 05:41:42 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/a-critique-of-the-apostles-of-change/

We remember the 1960s and early 1970s as a time of rapid social change, boundless optimism, and passionate activism. But some stories from that time are in danger of being forgotten. In this comprehensive yet concise study, historian Felipe Hinojosa focuses on radical Latin American political and social movements in four major American cities that included church occupations between 1969 and 1970.

These activists drew on Latin American liberation theology to resist racism, the intentional displacement of urban dwellers living in poverty, police brutality and other injustices. “To see these radical young people serving breakfast inside the church, quoting verses from the Bible and proclaiming that the church belongs to the people,” writes Hinojosa in the book’s introduction, “shocked and motivated religious leaders to take action against some of the most iconic and historic events. institutions of the country: Methodist, Presbyterian and Catholic churches.


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Psychiatry Must Get Right With God https://warriorsforchristonline.org/psychiatry-must-get-right-with-god/ Tue, 15 Jun 2021 12:00:12 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/psychiatry-must-get-right-with-god/

At the start of the pandemic, economist Jeanet Bentzen of the University of Copenhagen looked at Google searches for the word “prayer” in 95 countries. She identified that they had reached an unprecedented global high in March 2020, and that the increases have occurred alongside the number of COVID-19 cases identified in each country. In the United States, according to the Pew Research Center, 55% of Americans prayed to end the spread of the novel coronavirus in March 2020, and nearly a quarter said their faith increased the following month, despite an attack limited to places of worship.

These are not only interesting sociological trends, they are clinically significant. Spirituality has always been rejected by psychiatrists, but the results of a pilot program at McLean Hospital in Massachusetts indicate that attention to it is an essential aspect of mental health care.

In 2017, my multidisciplinary team of mental health clinicians, researchers and chaplains created Spiritual Psychotherapy for Hospital, Residential and Intensive Treatment (SPIRIT), a flexible and spiritually integrated form of cognitive behavioral therapy. We subsequently trained a group of over 20 clinicians, located in 10 different clinical units across McLean Hospital, to deliver SPIRIT and evaluate the approach. Since 2017, SPIRIT has been delivered to more than 5,000 people. Our results suggest that spiritual psychotherapy is not only feasible but highly desired by patients.

In the past year, America’s mental health has fallen to an all-time low: the incidence of mental disorders increased by 50% compared to before the pandemic, alcohol and other substance abuse increased, and young adults were more than twice as likely to seriously consider suicide than they were in 2018. Yet the only group to see improvements mental health during the past year were those who attended religious services at least once a week (virtually or in person): 46% report having “excellent” mental health today compared to 42% there is one year old. As former Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy and journalist Stephen Fried wrote in their book A common struggle, the two most underrated treatments for mental disorders are “love and faith”.

It’s no wonder that almost 60% of psychiatric patients want to discuss spirituality as part of their treatment. Yet we rarely offer such an opportunity. Since Sigmund Freud called religion “mass delirium” nearly 100 years ago, mental health professionals and scientists have avoided the spiritual realm. Current efforts to flatten the COVID-19 mental health curve have been almost entirely secular. The American Psychological Association’s extensive body of consumer resources make no mention of spirituality. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s only spiritual recommendation is to “connect with your community or faith-based organizations.” Of the more than 90,000 active projects currently funded by the 27 National Institutes of Health institutes and centers, fewer than 20 mention spirituality anywhere in the abstract, and only one project contains this term in its title. Needless to say, the lack of funding for spiritual research hinders clinical innovation and dissemination.

This situation goes beyond the separation of Church and State. Healthcare professionals mistakenly disconnect common spiritual behaviors and experiences from science and clinical practice. As a result, we ignore potential spiritual solutions to our mental health crisis, even when our well-being is worse than ever.

My own research has shown that a belief in God is associated with better treatment outcomes for acute psychiatric patients. And other labs have shown a link between religious belief and the thickness of the cerebral cortex, which may help protect against depression. Of course, belief in God is not a prescription. But these compelling findings warrant further scientific exploration, and patients in distress should certainly be given the opportunity to include spirituality in their treatment.

Recently, one of my patients, a conspicuously secular 22-year-old woman, presented with a slight increase in depression and anxiety. She said she felt “defeated” and said she was losing hope of ever improving. I have learned from my research that many secular people believe in Something, and therefore I assess spirituality with all patients, regardless of their religious affiliation or absence. In this context, this particular patient shared with me that she believed in God and also believed that she had been brought to this earth for a specific purpose. In just three sessions focused on these ideas, she felt increased hope that she could overcome the challenges in her life, and her symptoms of depression began to subside.

In another case, a devout Christian in his 60s presented to McLean Hospital with severe depression and acute suicidal tendencies. Her treatment team was aware of her faith but did not know how to approach her in therapy. I was asked to see the patient, who reported to me that he had difficulty praying and thinking about God in his depression. We set aside time for prayer and religious study, and I encouraged conversations with his pastor. Within a month, her depression began to ease for the first time in over a year.

Countless anecdotes of this nature occurred during a recent one-year clinical trial of SPIRIT that my research team completed with funding from the Bridges Consortium (supported by the John Templeton Foundation). Over 90 percent of patients reported receiving some kind of benefit, regardless of their religious affiliation.

The study also revealed key opportunities in patient care, particularly for younger and seemingly secular patients. Psychiatric folklore has long suggested that psychotic, manic, and obsessive patients gravitate more towards spirituality, just like the elderly. Our results suggest, however, that patients benefited from SPIRIT regardless of their diagnosis or age. Apparently, depressed millennials are just as likely to want and benefit from spiritual psychotherapy as are geriatric patients.

Our results also suggest that spiritual care is do not only for religious people. The largest group of patients to voluntarily attend SPIRIT (39 percent of our sample) were individuals with no religious affiliation. Apparently, many non-religious people still seek spirituality, especially in times of distress. In fact, these people may be more likely to undergo spiritual psychotherapy because their spiritual needs are otherwise ignored. In this vein, recent declines in church membership may increase the need for spiritual care.

Perhaps most interestingly, patients responded better to SPIRIT when issued by clinicians without religious affiliation. This startling finding suggests that lay clinicians may be particularly effective in providing spiritual treatment. This is good news because psychiatrists are the least likely of all doctors to be religious.

It remains to be seen if God can solve our mental health crisis. But the potential clinical benefits of spirituality and the patients’ desire for spiritual treatments provide reason to believe.

IF YOU NEED HELP
If you or someone you know is having difficulty or having thoughts of suicide, help is available. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK), use Lifebuoy cat or contact the Crisis Text Line by calling TALK on 741741.


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A call for religious reform https://warriorsforchristonline.org/a-call-for-religious-reform/ Mon, 14 Jun 2021 10:35:16 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/a-call-for-religious-reform/

The name of Karl Marx is no stranger to academia and politics. He was born in Trier, Germany on May 5, 1818 and died in London on March 14, 1883. He was a multidisciplinary researcher in the fields of philosophy, history, sociology, political science and l ‘economy. His major works include The Communist Manifesto (1848) and Das Capital (three volumes, 1867-83).

Marx’s critical theories of society, economics and politics are synthesized in what is called Marxism, which explored how human societies were transformed by class conflict, namely between and within ruling classes (bourgeoisie) and working classes (proletariat). The bourgeoisie controlled the means of production, while the proletariat simply worked for wages.

By deploying historical materialism, Marx claimed that capitalism caused many tensions. These tensions grew in class consciousness, leading to the establishment of what Marx called “a classless communist society”. but what does that mean? Does a classless communist society mean a society without religion?

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In 2002 John Raines published an insightful book titled Marx on religion. This book was a compilation of Karl Marx’s commentaries on religious matters. The version translated into Indonesian was then published in 2003, with an excellent introduction by a Jesuit priest and philosopher of German origin, Franz Magnis-Suseno.

The book, containing Marx’s critiques of religion, especially Christianity, is something to think about. Marx not only criticized the roles and functions of religion in his day, but also questioned the relevance of religion to spirituality, ethics, and morality. Marx was clearly uncomfortable with religion being used by those in power for their own political and economic ends.

This led Marx to conclude that religion is simply “the opium of the people” and that as opium it must therefore be eliminated. Eliminating religion is essential for people to find their true selves and happiness. However, Marx’s main challenge was neither to religion itself nor to the community of believers. In fact, he criticized the power structures and practices that allowed religion to be used as a legitimation for oppression and exploitation. Implicitly, according to Marx, religion can only be maintained if it has meaning for society. It was therefore imperative for religions, especially Christianity in Marx’s time, to meet again and renew themselves.

In countries like Indonesia where religion tends to be taken for granted, Marx’s point of view is a positive challenge

Marx’s ideas about religion were influenced by actual experiences during his upbringing, adolescence, and adulthood. The socio-economic and politico-religious situation of the time must be taken into consideration in order to understand Marx’s critique of religion. His stimulating thesis on religion was politically and economically conditioned. His theory must therefore be examined in the light of this context.

In our contemporary context today, Karl Marx’s notion of religion can be seen as a call to religious people to remain critical and to free religions from the hands of those who might use them to justify oppression and exploitation, even for violence and brutality.

In countries like Indonesia where religion tends to be taken for granted, Marx’s point of view is a positive challenge, not so much for a total abolition of religions, but more for honest and self-critical introspection. Marx calls us to religious reform from within.

Franz Magnis-Suseno, in his introduction to the translated edition of the book (2003), suggests that criticism of religion is essential. Echoing Marx, Magnis-Suseno asks us, as people of faith, to be critical of the structures and practices of political power. It also encourages us to recognize our involvement in social oppression and exploitation, past and present, in the hope that this awareness may prevent us from repeating harmful involvement in the future. Magnis-Suseno further asserts that religion should be a liberating force for people, experience and involvement in any type of systematic injustice. Religion which has lost its liberating function must therefore be called upon to review itself and reform itself.

Implicitly, in Marx’s view, religion as an ideology seems to have always been fertile ground for compromises of political power through the ages. These compromises can allow a kind of negative tolerance to exist in the face of social and economic injustices. Here, religion seems to have entered the political arena, and politics creeps into the religious space. The two, religion and politics, no longer become two separate entities and factions but are combined in a structure of reciprocity. They feed and exploit each other.

By observing closely the practice of religion and the social interactions of people during his lifetime, Marx thus concluded that religion was a creation of those who wielded power for their own sake, an interest that continues. Naturally, this conclusion sparked much debate and controversy, especially when Marx called religion “the opium of the people” and that as opium it should be completely abolished, unless religion itself just keeps working that way. A rhetorical question can be asked: can religion ever be completely abolished even if it continues to be experienced as opium?

A complete abolition of religion can also mean a complete elimination of humanity. Religion, in the broad sense, is as old as humanity. They coexist, and their coexistence indicates their interdependence, also depending on what religion is and how we understand it. Religion can be seen as a human affair concerning human interactions with both visible and invisible phenomena. It is important to distinguish between religion as power and social structure, and religion as an individual and community expression of faith and identity.

It is fair to argue that Karl Marx primarily criticized structured religion and challenged its misuse; he wasn’t too obsessed with religion itself in terms of experimenting with ways to eliminate it. He simply proposed that it was time for religion to be “buried” more in a metaphorical sense, so that new seeds could germinate for the good of all in societies. In fact, as in the case of Indonesia, religions are not only still alive today, but have become increasingly powerful.

Marx’s call for the complete abolition of religion in the 19th century should never be taken literally

Marx was a radical thinker, but all efforts to eliminate religion altogether have turned out to be meaningless. He simply hoped and waited for a radical change for the betterment of mankind. He may be right in his critique of religion, but his critique must be understood in the context of his time and struggle. His controversial views on religion therefore cannot be seen as a universal representation of realities in different places and times.

It is crucial to keep in mind that religion has always been a complex phenomenon. Marx’s call for the complete abolition of religion in the 19th century should never be taken literally. Rather, it should be understood in context and interpreted as a call for religious reform. But can this call for reform be considered an important and urgent issue in Indonesia? Any reform takes a lot of courage.

After the fall of Suharto in 1998, Indonesia began its era of reform. The year 1998 marked the end of Indonesia’s “dark era” and the start of a new era of enlightenment for Indonesian democracy. The policy of hope for a new look Indonesia where equality and inclusion reign, freedom of expression and the rule of law remains a work in progress. The loss of Ahok in the election of governor of Jakarta in 2017, mainly due to his religion and ethnicity, and the choice of vice president of Jokowi, a cleric and Islamic lecturer Ma’ruf Amin, may be taken as an indication that religion can still be used as a political means of power and ambition. Marx’s critique remains relevant.

Religious reform is first and foremost about the inner transformation of the way we conduct our lives according to the core of our faith. At every stage of history, including today, it is evident that there is also a constant need to reform powerful religious structures so that they also live out the mission of their faith, always on the side of the poor and the poor. marginalized, and not used as a tool of oppression by the rich and powerful.

Karl Marx’s interpretation of religion should challenge us to strengthen our faith in the goodness of God, mankind and nature.

Justin Wejak studied philosophy in Indonesia, theology and anthropology in Australia and currently teaches at the University of Melbourne. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official editorial position of UCA News.


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Ramaswami: When two worlds collide https://warriorsforchristonline.org/ramaswami-when-two-worlds-collide/ Sun, 13 Jun 2021 01:31:46 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/ramaswami-when-two-worlds-collide/

The metaphor of being ‘between two worlds’ is commonly used to describe the experiences of immigrants as they navigate the cultures of their home and host countries. As a second generation immigrant with my Indian parents, I had an experience that was no different. One world was Indian: I was at home with my family, or I went to the temple, or I went to a community center and I met other Indian families. At home I was chatty and loud, generally felt more comfortable, and spoke with an Indian accent. But in the other world, the American, at school, at work or with friends, I was more reluctant, serious and spoke with an American accent. The two worlds were, literally, separate spheres of life that rarely intersected.

Reflecting on my experience at Stanford, what really strikes me is how these two worlds started to collide and the consequences of such a drastic shift in perspective.

First of all, the Hindu religion, spirituality and Vedanta philosophy – once reserved for my Indian world – began to enter my American world. Part of it was because of meeting a ton of new people who were interested in topics that my friends back home never interested in, such as religion, philosophy, and the meaning of life. At Stanford, I started explaining concepts of Hindu philosophy and Vedanta – and even debating about them – with my friends at SLE. I enjoyed Hinduism in a different light by being able to read primary texts from religions such as Christianity and Islam. Classes that covered topics such as Buddhist meditation and Orientalism helped me better understand how South Asia was viewed by the West. In a course on the history of Asian South America, I learned about the long and complicated history of yoga gurus and teachers in 20th century America. I learned about direct correspondence and the exchange of ideas between Gandhi, who pursued Indian independence through spirituality, and black leaders of racial equality in America.

Additionally, new information about my Indian heritage and culture now came from my American world and influenced my Indian world. Through Sanskrit lessons at Stanford, I gained the confidence and ability to read ancient Hindu texts and scriptures in their original form. And for the first time, I befriended students who weren’t second-generation American Indians, but rather came from South Asia to study at Stanford. I befriended South Asians with new perspectives, who were Muslims, Parsis or Sikhs, or who came from Pakistan or Bangladesh. I learned, for example, the surprising fact (to me) that caste is not exclusive to Hindus. I spoke with my parents about who I met and what I learned, bringing this knowledge back to my Indian world and sharing with them a unique perspective on our own culture and religion.

At the same time, America’s politics began to creep into my Indian world. Donald Trump’s presidency, which aligned with most of my four years at Stanford, has strongly polarized South Asian Americans. While some supported actions such as banning Muslims, other South Asian Americans have become more politically active in response to the former president. My parents, who had little followed politics in the past, started discussing the news with me on a daily basis. American politics also became more familiar and accessible to us, when we realized that Vice President Kamala Harris’s mother was from the same place in Chennai where my mother grew up, Besant Nagar.

Thanks to Stanford, Indian politics also came to my American world. Like America, India was polarized by a new leader, whose party revolved around Hindu majoritarianism. At Stanford, I met friends on both sides of the Indian political spectrum, and Indian politics, which I was only vaguely aware of before college, began to play a bigger role in my life. I have participated in protests and debates with other students on important issues in Indian politics and learned from guest speakers at the Stanford Center for South Asia and the Stanford South Asian Society. These experiences gave me a new perspective with which to engage with people from my Indian world. But bringing up Indian politics with some parents, both in India and America, has become as toxic and uncomfortable as some families talking about American politics over Thanksgiving dinner. My Indian and American worlds collided.

The variety of perspectives and ideas I came into contact with at Stanford helped me transcend and ultimately eliminate the constructed boundaries that had separated my Indian and American worlds. While having lunch one day with an Indo-American friend and an Indian friend, I noticed that every other sentence I went from an Indian accent to an American accent, depending on who I was speaking to. . I realized that there were no longer – and never had been – “Indian” and “American” worlds that could be nicely encircled in discrete realms of experience. Both worlds were inevitably shaped by who I am as an Indian American and my own experiences in both worlds. Even the simplest distinction was not clear: my “Indian accent” sounds slightly American in India and my “American accent” sounds slightly Indian in America. Like the archetypal example of the rope and the serpent in Vedanta philosophy, any distinction I had perceived between these two worlds was only Maya, an illusion, and such a distinction quickly vanished once I got the right knowledge and the right perspective.

The collision of these worlds however left me with some important questions. First: growing up in America gave me a unique education. As a deeply religious Hindu, I have a rich knowledge of ancient Vedic scriptures and Vedanta philosophy. But South Asian Americans are continually trying to balance their American and South Asian identities, and even people living in South Asia are struggling to preserve old ways of life in the face of modernization. Meanwhile, religious tenets or race / caste appeals form the basis of the divisive politics that has engulfed India and America today. I also graduated in computer science from Stanford. The computer software industry is not only largely responsible for the recent waves of immigrants from India to America (including my parents), but has also resulted in negative societal effects, misinformation among Indian groups. WhatsApp to the lies about the 2020 election and COVID vaccines. South Asian Americans have become a unique and influential voice on these issues: advocating for fairness in their communities, leading multinational technology companies, breaking down barriers of US law and government, shaping America’s Indian politics and even finance Indian domestic politics. What responsibility do I have as a South Asian American and in what role can I use my interests to better serve society according to my values?

Next: Having your child graduate from Stanford would be any immigrant’s dream after arriving in this country. I got such an opportunity at Stanford, but at what cost and at whose expense? America is built on the genocide of indigenous peoples and the forced enslavement of others, including many injustices that have not even been fully recognized, let alone remedied. Unlike some cities in Southeast Asia that are thousands of years old, my home in Atlanta was native land just two centuries ago. Stanford itself is built on native land and on the exploitation of Chinese workers. And despite all the hard work my parents did to come here, it was only possible because they come from a well-off, upper caste Indian family who could actually afford to fly to the America – and to what extent has this inequality improved India? Being a Stanford graduate and an American citizen gives me an important opportunity and influence to advance the values ​​I believe in, but this very power is built on countless injustices past and present. Can the closeness to power that an education at Stanford gives me still give me the latitude to make the system fairer, rather than simply profiting from the injustices of the past?

These are some of the questions that have arisen in me over the past few years that will stay with me long after I graduate, after I started attending Georgetown Law School this fall, and after starting a career. career. I do not know to what extent I will find satisfactory answers there, but I do know that they are worth pursuing. And my friends, teachers, and experiences at Stanford were the ones who helped put these issues on the table in the first place.

Contact Ashwin Ramaswami at [email protected]


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Library conference to address psychedelic spirituality https://warriorsforchristonline.org/library-conference-to-address-psychedelic-spirituality/ Sat, 12 Jun 2021 13:02:14 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/library-conference-to-address-psychedelic-spirituality/

Dana sawyer
PHOTO COURTESY OF JESUP MEMORIAL LIBRARY

BAR PORTIn theJesupThe Memorial Library’s mission statement says it will meet “known and not yet felt needs”.

In this vein, the library is committed to being a source of reliable information on scientific topics, including the uses of psychedelics in therapeutic settings.

“We interpret (the mission statement) to mean that we should bring to our community information that may not yet be on their awareness radar on a topic that offers a huge opportunity to transform the treatment of a certain number of incredibly complicated and resilient mental health issues. problems, ”said RuthEveland, director of the library.

In January, the library hosted an event on the topic, inviting physicians from Cadillac Family Practice, MDI Behavioral Health Center and a medical student from Tufts University School of Medicine to discuss the use of psychedelics in different medical settings.

“There is a tremendous amount of incredible research going on in this area,” Eveland mentionned.

Later this month, the library revisits the subject with Dana Sawyer, a Blue Hill-based professor of philosophy and world religion at Maine College of Art.

In a virtual lecture, Sawyer will explore psychedelic mysticism from the perspective of religious studies.Hellexplore whether substances such as mescaline, LSD, psilocybin, and other psychedelic drugs trigger experiences of lasting spiritual value and will examine the research using the framework of Aldous Huxley, Huston Smith and more.

Sawyer wrote biographies of the two men and has major expertise in Hinduism and Buddhism. But for more than 20 years,he isalso focused on comparative mysticism, theories of perennial philosophy and the possible value of psychedelic experiences.

In an interview with the Islander, Sawyer said that often medical and therapeutic uses can also be directly related to spiritual uses.

You have to go through the experience itself for it to have a therapeutic effect, ”he said. “People who are going through this describe it as a spiritual experience.”

There has been a bit of a renaissance in the psychedelic movement and a revival of interest recently that has sparked discussions in several different areas.

It really created this multidisciplinary conversation which is exciting and interesting, ”Sawyer said.

Evelandadmits that these types of events may seem cutting edge to a local library, but she hoped people would see them as the library examining the subject through a scientific lens, not sensational.

I was obviously a bit prepared for someone to find this problematic one way or another, ”she said after the first event. “But all the responses have been very positive.”

Sawyer’s talk will take place on Zoom on June 17 at 7 p.m. To register, visit jesulibrary.org/events/sawyer and fill out the form or send an email [email protected]

Ethan Genter

Ethan is the maritime reporter for the Ellsworth American and the Mount Desert Islander. It also covers Bar Harbor. When not signaling, you’ll likely find him wandering the trails while listening to audiobooks. Send tips, story ideas and favorite Hancock County swimming holes to [email protected]

Ethan Genter


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Religious News | News, Sports, Jobs https://warriorsforchristonline.org/religious-news-news-sports-jobs-2/ Sat, 12 Jun 2021 06:09:30 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/religious-news-news-sports-jobs-2/

LONG WEDDINGS: Bishop David Bonnar of Youngstown will celebrate a special Mass at 2 p.m. Sunday at St. Columba Cathedral, Youngstown, to mark the wedding anniversaries of 135 couples who are honored for a total of 6,565 years of married life ranging from 25 to 70 years.

John and Marion Anderson, parishioners of St. Robert Bellarmine Parish, Cortland, and John and Mary Theresa Gabriele of Christ Our Savior Parish, Struthers, both celebrate 70 years of marriage in 2021.

The other celebrating couples will be: 38 married couples aged 51 to 68; 60 couples married for 50 years; 21 couples observing 40 years; and 13 couples marking 25 years.

The celebration of the wedding anniversary includes a renewal of the wedding vows at Mass and a personalized certificate. Due to concerns over COVID-19, many couples will not attend the celebration in person but will participate via the live broadcast of the Mass on the Diocese of Youngstown website at https: // doy. org / media / etclive-2 /.

APPOINTMENTS MADE: Bishop David Bonnar of the Diocese of Youngstown made the following appointments to the clergy:

l Reverend Ryan Furlong has been appointed part-time director of the Ministry of Youth and Young Adults, effective July 1. He will continue to serve as parish vicar in St. Charles, Boardman.

l Reverend G. David Weikart was appointed pastor of the parishes of Saint Joseph and Regina Coeli in Alliance, Saint Joseph in Maximo and Sainte-Anne in Sebring effective September 1st. He also appointed Amy Benedetti-Dike and Deacon Greg Wood, the pastoral associates of these four parishes, effective September 1. Wood will also exercise his diaconal ministry in the four parishes. In addition, Bonnar has appointed Reverend Patrick Manning and Reverend Peter Haladej sacramental ministers for these four parishes, effective September 1.

With the appointments, Bonnar continues the regional planning process, building a brighter future for the diocese that makes the best use of all available resources and continues to support the clergy and staff as they serve the church in the Diocese of Youngstown.

NEW PASTOR: The Church of the Holy Spirit, 1996 Coit Road NW, Warren, will welcome new Pastor William Wiley and his wife Donna at 10 a.m. on Sunday. An open house will follow.

POSTPONED EVENT: The annual Taste of Faiths event hosted by the Mahoning Valley Association of Churches is postponed to Spring 2022. The annual event celebrates the food of the Mahoning Valley congregations. For more information, visit www.mvaconline.org

DRIVE-THRU EVENT: Central Christian Church, 2051 E. Market St., Warren, will be hosting a drive-through lunch at 11:30 am today in the church parking lot.

BIBLE SCHOOL: Howland United Methodist Church will host VBS from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. for two weeks. The first week is June 21, 23 and 25 for younger children and week 2 is June 28, 30 and July 2 for older children. The theme is “Summer Olympics.” Efforts will be made to organize all outdoor events.

BIBLE SCHOOL: Blessed Sacrament Parish in Warren will host VBS from 9:30 am to noon Monday through Friday. The theme is “Laboratory of Peace”.

WHEEL MONDAY: Unity Spiritual Center, 1226 Naylor Lloyd Road in Liberty, will host the Unity Wheel Mondays from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the third Monday of each month. People can bring an outdoor chair or blanket and any musical instruments they may have. The offering for the wheel can be cornmeal, tobacco, birdseed, or whatever you feel is appropriate to thank the creator. The plans are to walk the wheel, discover the meaning of the parts of the wheel, the native drum, the smear and the community.

135 YEARS CELEBRATION: First Covenant Church in Boardman will be celebrating its 135th anniversary on June 27. The event will include a service at 10 a.m. with guest speakers sharing stories and stories from the church.

COMMUNITY CONCERT: The Unity Spiritual Center, 1226 Naylor Lloyd Road, will sponsor a community concert at 5:30 p.m. on June 26. The outdoor concert will feature Nina and Rick Miller performing songs from the 50s, 60s and 70s. Participants are welcome to bring a lawn chair and are invited to picnic with family and friends. In case of rain, the show will be moved indoors. The concert is free, but donations will be accepted. For more information, call 330-539-0122.

GUEST SPEAKER: The Greater Apostolic Faith Church continues its Wednesday evening worship and praise services with surrounding community churches in Trumbull and Mahoning counties. The guest speaker is Bishop Ernest B. Hawkins of the Youngstown Temple of Apostolic Faith at 7:00 p.m. Wednesday.

Hawkins has been a pastor for 28 years and he will bring his congregation and worship team to lift up the name of Jesus.

SUMMER CAMPS: Pleasant Valley Church in Liberty will host summer camps from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. from June 21 to 24 with the theme “Fruits of the Spirit”. There will be crafts, music, sports and art. Sports World athletes will lead each camp. Register at www.pvchurch.net

LABYRINTH EVENT: Villa Maria Education and Spirituality Center, 2067 Evergreen Road, Villa Maria, PA, will offer a virtual introduction to the Maze Journey via Zoom. The virtual labyrinthine walk invites participants to walk an ancient path symbolizing cultural passages.

The future programs of this ongoing series are scheduled on different dates on the grounds of the Villa Maria community center: Wednesday July 21, August 18 and September 19. Guided labyrinth walks are offered free of charge.

Call 724-964-8886 or visit vmesc.org.

To submit an article for the religion section, send an email to religion @ tribto day.com. Articles are needed by Wednesday for the Saturday newspaper.

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hunger strike in Belgium; SBC voltage https://warriorsforchristonline.org/hunger-strike-in-belgium-sbc-voltage/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 22:00:25 +0000 https://warriorsforchristonline.org/hunger-strike-in-belgium-sbc-voltage/

(RNS) – Each week, Religion News Service features a photo gallery of religious expressions from around the world. This week’s selection of photos includes a hunger strike in Belgium, tensions ahead of the Southern Baptist Convention meeting and more.

Note: RNS expands photos of the week to include photos of readers. Please submit current photos of your practice of religion, spirituality or beliefs HERE.

Dwight McKissic, senior pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church, speaks during services in Arlington, Texas on Sunday, June 6, 2021. In December 2020, McKissic was one of the co-signers of a statement by a multiethnic group of Baptists of the South claiming that systemic racial injustice is a reality. “Some recent events have left many brothers and sisters of color feeling betrayed and wondering if the SBC is committed to racial reconciliation,” the statement said. The SBC’s annual meeting takes place next week in Nashville. (AP Photo / Richard W. Rodriguez)

Visitors take photos with blooming hydrangea flowers at Meigetsu-in Buddhist Temple on Friday, June 11, 2021, in Kamakura, Japan, south of Tokyo.  (AP Photo / Kiichiro Sato)

Visitors take photos with blooming hydrangea flowers at Meigetsu-in Buddhist Temple on Friday, June 11, 2021, in Kamakura, Japan, south of Tokyo. (AP Photo / Kiichiro Sato)

Tony Spell, pastor of Life Tabernacle Church in Central City, Louisiana, waits before the 5th New Orleans Circuit Court of Appeals on June 7, 2021. Spell, who flouted coronavirus restrictions the year last, prepared Monday to ask the court to revive its lawsuit challenging the restrictions.  (AP Photo / Gerald Herbert)

Tony Spell, pastor of Life Tabernacle Church in Central City, Louisiana, waits before the 5th New Orleans Circuit Court of Appeals on June 7, 2021. Spell, who flouted coronavirus restrictions the year last, prepared Monday to ask the court to revive its lawsuit challenging the restrictions. (AP Photo / Gerald Herbert)

Muslim faithful on hunger strike pray as they occupy the Saint-Jean-Baptiste-au-Béguinage church in Brussels, Monday, June 7, 2021. Dozens of undocumented migrants who have occupied the church since last February, with the authorization of the priest, began a hunger strike on May 23, 2021, to draw the attention of the Brussels authorities to their plight.  (AP Photo / Francisco Seco)

Muslim faithful on hunger strike pray as they occupy the Saint-Jean-Baptiste-au-Béguinage church in Brussels, Monday, June 7, 2021. Dozens of undocumented migrants who have occupied the church since last February with the authorization from the parish priest, began a hunger strike on May 23, 2021, to draw the attention of the Brussels authorities to their plight. (AP Photo / Francisco Seco)

A Red Cross health worker assists a man on hunger strike as he occupies the Saint-Jean-Baptiste-au-Béguinage church in Brussels, Monday, June 7, 2021. Dozens of undocumented migrants who occupy the church since last February, with the authorization of the parish priest, began a hunger strike on May 23, 2021, to draw the attention of the Brussels authorities to their plight.  (AP Photo / Francisco Seco)

A Red Cross health worker assists a man on hunger strike as he occupies the Saint-Jean-Baptiste-au-Béguinage church in Brussels, Monday, June 7, 2021. Dozens of undocumented migrants who have occupied the church since last February with the authorization of the parish priest, began a hunger strike on May 23, 2021, to draw the attention of the Brussels authorities to their plight. (AP Photo / Francisco Seco)

Khalida Ashram and her daughter Anila mourn at the scene of an attack on Monday, involving a driver accused of plowing a pickup truck into an immigrant family of five in London, Ont. On Tuesday, June 8, 2021. The Prime Minister Canadian Justin Trudeau has denounced the attack as police say the attack was aimed at Muslims.  (Geoff Robins / The Canadian Press via AP)

Khalida Ashram and her daughter Anila mourn at the scene of an attack on Monday, involving a driver accused of plowing a pickup truck into an immigrant family of five in London, Ont. On Tuesday, June 8, 2021. The Prime Minister Canadian Justin Trudeau has denounced the attack as police say the attack was aimed at Muslims. (Geoff Robins / The Canadian Press via AP)

People walk in front of the Parthenon temple during a media tour for foreign correspondents organized by the Greek Ministry of Culture on Acropolis Hill in Athens on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. Following COVID-19 travel restrictions last year, tourism-dependent Greece hopes to see a significant increase in tourist arrivals this summer, and expanded its list of nationalities allowed for non-essential travel to 23 countries - including the United States, the United Kingdom United and China - as well as members of the European Union and the Schengen Passport-Free Travel Zone.  (AP Photo / Thanassis Stavrakis)

People walk in front of the Parthenon temple during a media tour for foreign correspondents organized by the Greek Ministry of Culture on Acropolis Hill in Athens on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. Following COVID-19 travel restrictions last year, tourism-dependent Greece hopes to see a significant increase in tourist arrivals this summer, and expanded its list of nationalities allowed for non-essential travel to 23 countries – including the US, the UK and China – as well as members of the European Union and the Schengen area of ​​passport-free travel. (AP Photo / Thanassis Stavrakis)

Family members pray during the funeral of their loved one in a section of Srengseng Sawah cemetery reserved for those who have died of COVID-19, in Jakarta, Indonesia on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. The fourth most populous country in the world, with around 275 million people, has reported more cases of the coronavirus than any other country in Southeast Asia.  (AP Photo / Tatan Syuflana)

Family members pray during the funeral of their loved one in a section of Srengseng Sawah cemetery reserved for those who have died of COVID-19, in Jakarta, Indonesia on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. The fourth most populous country in the world, with around 275 million people, has reported more cases of the coronavirus than any other country in Southeast Asia. (AP Photo / Tatan Syuflana)

A hiker explores Deir Qalaa, "Castle Monastery," the remains of a Byzantine monastery near the Jewish settlement of Peduel and the Palestinian village of Deir Balout, west of the West Bank town of Salfit, on Friday June.  November 11, 2021. A growing number of Palestinians are embarking on the trek, which offers a way to explore the countryside and historic monuments of the Israeli-occupied West Bank.  (AP Photo / Nasser Nasser)

A hiker explores Deir Qalaa, “Castle Monastery,” the remains of a Byzantine monastery near the Jewish settlement of Peduel and the Palestinian village of Deir Balout, west of the West Bank town of Salfit, on Friday June. November 11, 2021. A growing number of Palestinians are embarking on the trek, which offers a way to explore the countryside and historic monuments of the Israeli-occupied West Bank. (AP Photo / Nasser Nasser)

Reader photos

The Corpus Christi procession begins at St. Anthony's Church in St. Louis, Missouri on June 7, 2021. The traditional 140-year-old procession is led by a group.  Photo by Barb Gilman

The Corpus Christi procession begins at St. Anthony’s Church in St. Louis, Missouri on June 7, 2021. The traditional 140-year-old procession is led by a group. Photo by Barb Gilman

Photos archive

Senator Daniel P. Moynihan (D-NY) addresses delegates to the biennial national convention of the American Jewish Congress in Washington in May 1980. With him, from left to right, are Phil Baum, Associate Executive Director, Henry Siegman, executive director, and Howard M. Squadron, president.  In a sobering speech for Jewish leaders, Mr. Moynihan warned that "the shift of military power from the United States to the Soviet Union" weighs heavily on American diplomacy, demanding "painful and expensive approaches" to curb Soviet expansionism in the Middle East and Southwest Asia." He stated, "It is clear that in the aftermath of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Administration began to seek a resolution of the Palestinian question clearly opposed to Israel, as a means of strengthening the American position in the region.  RNS archive photo.  Photo courtesy of the Presbyterian Historical Society.

Senator Daniel P. Moynihan addresses delegates to the biennial national convention of the American Jewish Congress in Washington in May 1980. In a thought-provoking speech, Moynihan warned that “the shift in military power from the United States towards the Soviet Union “takes a heavy toll on American diplomacy, demanding” painful and costly approaches “to controlling Soviet expansionism in the Middle East and Southwest Asia. He said: “It is clear that following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Administration began to seek a resolution of the clearly tilted Palestinian issue against Israel, as a means of strengthening the US position in the conflict. region. RNS archive photo. Photo courtesy of the Presbyterian Historical Society.

Fascinated children gaze at a truck full of Christmas presents, donated by school children in Delaware County, New York, as a sign of friendship and goodwill to children of other nations, and to be sent overseas by through the Global Childhood Friendship Committee, is received by Reverend Herbert C. Lytle Jr., left, Church World Service administrative secretary to George Taylor, right, chairman of the Board of Education in Stamford, New York, during ceremonies held in New York on October 13, 1948.  RNS file photo by Lou Pentler.  Photo courtesy of the Presbyterian Historical Society.

Fascinated children gaze at a truck full of Christmas presents, donated by school children in Delaware County, New York, as a sign of friendship and goodwill to children of other nations, and to be sent overseas by through the Global Childhood Friendship Committee, is received by Reverend Herbert C. Lytle Jr., left, Church World Service administrative secretary to George Taylor, right, chairman of the Board of Education in Stamford, New York, during ceremonies held in New York on October 13, 1948. RNS file photo by Lou Pentler. Photo courtesy of the Presbyterian Historical Society.


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